Taking in Art: The Elise S. Haas Collection and more

Since my last visit to SFMOMA the Elise S. Haas collection has gone up and transformed the gallery space. What a wonderful collection!

Still thinking about where technology fits in life and art. For now, I think I’m more interested in the relationship between art of the past and contemporary art than for an art that is focused on NOW! Abstract musings aside, I do try to hit museums or galleries at least once a week because I like to look at what artists are doing and how people are presenting art in general.

Today was my day to get out and about this week. Since I haven’t been to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art lately, I decided to visit there first.

Since my last visit to SFMOMA the Elise S. Haas collection has gone up and transformed the gallery space. What a wonderful collection! SFMOMA described the exhibition in 2008 as follows:

It would be hard to overestimate the significance of the Elise S. Haas collection for SFMOMA. Made up of some 35 paintings, sculptures, and works on paper, this group of stunning early modernist works highlights especially the art of Henri Matisse and Henry Moore but also includes pieces by such luminaries as Pablo Picasso, Constantin Brancusi, and Barbara Hepworth. A student of art herself, Haas not only collected works by these great artists, but she also endeavored to get to know them personally. Though the collection now seems classic, it was one of the most cutting edge of its time, setting a forward-thinking example that continues to inspire the collecting practices of SFMOMA to this day.

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Blogging in an age of Quantum Computing?

As I revive the Diatrope Blog, and recognize that I, too, am a part of this revolutionary wave by having a blog, I wonder what I will say here and whether this is a conversation of importance today.

Maybe I was one of those kids that read (and re-read) 1984 too many times as a kid. Reading this morning that Lockheed Martin will make commercial use of quantum computing this morning made me wonder how it will impact the increasing loss of privacy we experience everyday with all the social networking and computing inventions of late. The claim is that moving to zero and one coding to a system where a one can be a one, or a one and a zero and everything in between, all at the same time. The value, they say, is that the complexity of the options could solve some business and science problems millions of times faster than can be done today.

As I revive the Diatrope Blog, and recognize that I, too, am a part of this revolutionary wave by having a blog, I wonder what I will say here and whether this is a conversation of importance today. I would like to highlight things that may be out-of-fashion, but yet have substance, a quality soring lacking in a world where twitter-speak discourages in-depth engagement with ideas and life too. I will also include tidbits of things I like, for example I was excited to see that the Met Museum in NYC will be open on Mondays come July.

I will also post events that I wish I could attend. For example, I just saw that there is a Science Quiz Night in Washington DC on Wednesday, March 27, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Koshland Science Museum
525 E St., N.W., Washington, D.C.

 The blurb reads:

Participate in a science quiz night that will test your knowledge about a range of current scientific issues, from genomics to climate change. Put together a team of friends, or come and meet new people while enjoying this fun and engaging evening sponsored by the Koshland Science Museum and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.



Purchase tickets online 
or call the museum at 202-334-1201.

D.C. Art Science Evening Rendezvous (DASER)

Moderated by JD Talasek. Exploring the theme of Water.

Exploring the theme of water

Thursday, March 21, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Keck Center, 500 Fifth St., N.W.
A reception follows from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Moderated by JD Talasek with Hali Felt, author of Soundings: The Story of the Remarkable Woman Who Mapped the Ocean FloorKevin Finneran , editor-in-chief, Issues in Science and TechnologyConnie Imboden, photographer and photography professor, Maryland Institute College of Art;
 Heather Spence, marine biologist

Register here

Visit CPNAS’s website for more information: http://www.cpnas.org/events/daser-032113.html

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Simplicity: Ideals of Practice in Mathematics & the Arts

Science & the Arts Program

Simplicity: Ideals of Practice in Mathematics & the Arts

April 3 – 5, 9:00am – 5:00pm
Proshansky Auditorium, CUNY Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue (at 34th St), NYC

Join us for a 3-day conference featuring lectures by and conversations among twenty-five mathematicians, artists, art historians, philosophers, and architects, accompanied by a program of artist’s films.

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